Research Tools

Research Tools

IFPRI's recently released indicator of protection, the Nominal Rate of Protection (NRP). Great Country and Commodity Coverage. 2005-2015

The Nominal Rate of Protection (NRP) measures the extent to which a set of agricultural policies affects the market price of a commodity. It is computed as the price difference, expressed as a percentage, between the farm gate price received by producers and an undistorted reference price at the farm gate level. This indicator is not aimed to provide a holistic measurement of various agricultural policies, in contrast with the Producer Support Estimate (PSE) or the Nominal Rate of Assistance (NRA). It focuses only on the price implications of policies and will be larger for countries using price interventions compared to countries using farm subsidies. While applied to the production value evaluated at reference prices, the value of distortions is related to the market price support (MPS) metric. 


Still the Gold Standard for Coverage and Depth.  

The World Bank’s research project on “Distortions to Agricultural Incentives” has produced a core database of Nominal Rates of Assistance to producers, or NRAs, together with a set of Consumer Tax Equivalents, or CTEs, for farm products and a set of Relative Rates of Assistance to farmers in 75 focus countries (since expanded to 82, listed here).  Coverage from 1955-2011 This page provides details of that core database. 


FAOSTAT provides free access to food and agriculture data for over 245 countries and territories and covers all FAO regional groupings from 1961 to the most recent year available.


World Development Indicators (WDI) is the primary World Bank collection of development indicators, compiled from officially recognized international sources. It presents the most current and accurate global development data available, and includes national, regional and global estimates.


The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA) was signed into law on September 26, 2006. The legislation required that federal contract, grant, loan, and other financial assistance awards of more than $25,000 be displayed on a searchable, publicly accessible website, USAspending.gov, to give the American public access to information on how their tax dollars are being spent. As a matter of discretion, USAspending.gov also displays certain federal contrac of more than $3,000. The initial site went live in 2007.


This site contains over 40 indicators related to food security, commodity prices, economics, and human well-being. Much of this data is available for every country in the world and goes back over 50 years. We draw from public, authoritative data sources like the World Bank, the FAO, UNICEF, and others, as well as IFPRI's own data.


Voteview allows users to view every congressional roll call vote in American history on a map of the United States and on a liberal-conservative ideological map including information about the ideological positions of voting Senators and Representatives. The original Voteview of DOS was developed by Keith T. Poole and Howard Rosenthal at Carnegie-Mellon University between 1989 and 1992. Poole and Rosenthal developed Voteview for Windows in 1993 at Princeton University and that work was continued by Boris Shor. The legacy version of the website is available at legacy.voteview.com



The Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) is the nation’s leading competitive grants program for agricultural sciences. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) awards AFRI research, education, and extension grants to combat childhood obesity, improve rural economies, increase food production, create new sources of energy, mitigate the impacts of climate variability, address water availability issues, ensure food safety and security, and train the next generation of agricultural workforce.


National, International, Regional, and Industry level economic indicators.  BEA's interactive data application is the one stop shop for accessing BEA data on the fly. The interactive application makes it easier to access and use our statistics by providing a common look and feel for users accessing national, international, regional or industry statistics. The application makes the data easier to print, save and export. The charting features are robust and visually appealing. The application also allows for data sharing with others via a number of social tools.


Data are compiled in terms of commodity classification, quantities, values, shipping weights, method of transportation (air or vessel), state of (movement) origin, customs district, customs port, country of destination, and whether contents are domestic goods or re-exports. Since January 1989, commodities have been compiled under Schedule B harmonized classifications of domestic and foreign commodity exports. These transactions are classified under approximately 8,000 different products leaving the United States. Statistics are also complied under the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), End-Use Commodity Classification, and Advanced Technology Products. These statistics include data about all 240 U.S. trading partners, 400 U.S. ports, and 45 districts.


The Census of Agriculture is a complete count of U.S. farms and ranches and the people who operate them. Even small plots of land - whether rural or urban - growing fruit, vegetables or some food animals count if $1,000 or more of such products were raised and sold, or normally would have been sold, during the Census year.

The Census of Agriculture, taken only once every five years, looks at land use and ownership, operator characteristics, production practices, income and expenditures. For America’s farmers and ranchers, the Census of Agriculture is their voice, their future, and their opportunity.


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